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Greyhound Racing (Dogs)

Jai Alai

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Beginners' guide to betting on Greyhound Racing

Handicapping Terms

Early Speed / Front Runners. There are two types of early speed dogs. One type shows a strong break out of the box - the break call is approximately four lengths from the starting box. The other type tends to break moderately and then rush or drive the first turn.

Late Speed / Closers. Late speed dogs generally show a somewhat slow break out of the box. They come to the 8th call following the pack. From here on out is where the closers run their race. Some may show a gradual gain throughout the race, while others wait until late in the race to make their move. This type of a runner pushes hard in the stretch passing many of the dogs and should never be underestimated.

Class. Determining the class of the race can be tough sometimes. This can depend on the stats you have available to you. Look first to find the one showing the most "in the money" finishes at the current grade racing. Next, look for grade drops and how competitive the dog was in the higher grade. Class tends to be a much stronger variable in higher-grade races.

Time. This variable brings many arguments between handicappers. Some tend to place this factor at the top of the list, while others consider this lightly. Some observers have found a strong correlation with the dogs having the fastest times generally will also be the class of the race.

Heart. This factor can be gauged as seen in our stats. If a dog exhibits heart, he shows the ability and determination to come back after finding trouble. This type of competitor will either finish in the money or make a strong attempt to do so.

Trouble. Trouble is the toughest variable to be found in handicapping. Coming into the first turn is where most of the trouble occurs. This is where the early speed/front runners can benefit by being out of harm’s way. The positive aspect of trouble is that it produces the higher payoffs. When selecting your key greyhound in a wager, consider his trouble percentage. If he shows a high percentage of trouble and doesn't seem to benefit by his post-position, look to another greyhound as a key.

How Odds Work

Each runner is listed by number on the Odds Board (or tote Board). Odds are posted next to the number. These odds are for the win pool only. They have no relation to the place, show, quiniela, or any other pool.

On the right of the Odds Board, each Quiniela combination is listed with odds posted next to the combinations.

The odds change often before the race, based upon the amount of money being bet on each runner in each pool and are based on the number of wagers placed on a particular runner. As more wagers are placed on a runner for a win or quiniela combination, the odds go down. If fewer wagers are placed on a runner, the odds go up.

Odds listed on the Board are all $1.00 odds. If a runner or Quiniela combination wins at 5-1 odds, the payoff on a $2.00 wager is approximately $12.00 (your $2.00 wager plus five times that amount for a winning selection).

Regardless of how much money is bet on a favorite, the track must pay $2.10 for each $2.00 winning bet.

There's no limit on how much can be won on any single bet. Only the odds determine the amounts.

After each race, the Odds Board will show which runners came in first, second, third, and fourth.

The Odds Board show payoffs on all wagers for that race and remember, the Odds Board is only an aid to the bettor. Errors on the Board will be corrected, however, the Association will pay only the correct winning price.

About Greyhound Racing

Dog racing is a sport run by greyhounds.

The dogs chase a mechanical lure, typically an artificial bone, which is called a hare. The hare starts about half a circuit behind the start. When it passes a point near the starting traps, it automatically triggers the gate and releases the dogs. Should the dogs catch or overtake the lure, the race is declared void.

Although the dogs are normally docile creatures, they become very excited when they race, and there are times when a runner may turn its head aggressively on another runner. This is why the dogs wear muzzles when they race.

History Of Greyhounds

Greyhounds were first introduced to America in the 18th century to help farmers control the jackrabbit population. As time went by, the farmers started to conduct some form of competitive greyhound racing which evolved into the greyhound track racing as we know it today.

The origin of the greyhound is quite old, possibly dating back thousands of years. The Pharaohs rated them first among all animals as both pets and hunters. Images of the early greyhound can be seen etched on walls of ancient Egyptian tombs. In Arabian culture at that time, the birth of a greyhound ranked nearly as high as the birth of a son. In Persia, Rome and Greece, the greyhound enjoyed similar standing.